State of the Nation

Nation Towers, Abu Dhabi, UAE, Specifies Sustainable SSPS.

To provide a sustainable solution, the Studor Single Pipe System (SSPS) was specified for installation at Nation Towers, Abu Dhabi, because it allowed for flexibility and simplicity in design, whilst also significantly reducing the amount of materials (pipework) required.

Nation Towers on the Abu Dhabi Corniche is a spectacular development comprising:

Air Admittance Valves, Drainage Venting Solutions

Nation Towers

  • High-rise, residential apartments and penthouses
  • First class office spaces
  • A chic boutique-style mall
  • The deluxe St. Regis Hotel, incorporating the Nation Riviera private beach club.

A unique feature of the two towers is the Sky Bridge that connects both buildings, making it the world’s highest interconnecting bridge. Wherever possible, Nation Towers has been built with environmentally friendly, low emitting and regionally available products.

The SSPS was chosen because it provides superior drainage ventilation performance over other comparable conventional systems, which incorporate excess use of pipes. These substantial material savings reduce the quantity of pipe and the associated CO₂ emissions to produce and transport this pipe to site.

The P.A.P.A. - Studor. Drainage Ventilation Technology. Air Admittance Valves. Drainage Systems

The P.A.P.A. Part of the Studor Single Pipe System

Using SSPS products increased the sustainability of Nation Tower’s drainage ventilation without the need for roof or surface penetrations, thereby improving the thermal integrity of the building, whilst also making substantial savings in time, materials and labour costs. The Nation Towers project involved the installation of:

The SSPS design significantly reduced the quantity of pipe, compared to a conventional design, by over 36,000 metres. It also enabled the number of stacks to be dramatically reduced from 51 to 15 for Tower 1, and from 24 to 12 for Tower 2.

Due to the specialised Studor design, the velocity breakers and relief vents were also eliminated from the vertical stacks.

 

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The Only Line of Defence

Why the quality of AAVs must be high

The water trap seal is the only barrier between the drainage system and the living and/or Quality Air Admittance Valvesworking space; it is therefore essential that this is maintained at all times. The loss of a trap seal results in unwanted smells, noise and, importantly, the risk of pathogens spreading from the drainage system into the inhabited space. Whilst these are unpleasant in a domestic environment, there are serious health and safety concerns in a commercial environment, where the building owners and/or occupiers have a duty of care.

An Air Admittance Valve (AAV) is a thin but very effectual line of defence. It balances pressure in the drainage system, opening to allow fresh air in but sealing tight to keep nasties in their place.

Critical aspects of an AAV’s operation are:
• The need to respond quickly to changes in pressure, every time.
• The necessity to seal completely tight with no leakage whatsoever.
• Longevity of operation; as long as the drainage system itself.

Various standards exist across the world to “police” the performance and installation of AAVs. However, the implementation of these standards varies widely, with some countries having no relevant standards or approvals. Studor has been instrumental in working with various standards bodies, worldwide.

There is such a risk from the drainage system that there really should be standards in place to ensure that poor quality AAVs cannot be installed. With events such as the tragic SARS outbreak in the Amoy Gardens complex in Hong Kong, where it was proven that defective water trap seals had been a major contributor to the spread of disease, comes an increasing awareness and knowledge of the ever-increasing risks from drainage systems.

Quality Air Admittance ValvesUnfortunately, there are many poor quality AAVs produced around the world and a number of these have severely damaged the reputation of AAVs in many countries, often where standards did not exist, or false claims of compliance were made. All Studor AAVs are manufactured to the highest standards and because of our commitment to quality manufacture, all Studor products carry a “lifetime of system” warranty, which guarantees that all products will be defect free. It is our ethos to strive to exceed the statutory minimum requirements, not merely comply with them.

In Europe, EN12380 requires a “System 4” assessment of conformity, which means that no independent involvement is required to comply with the standard. However, unlike many other AAV manufacturers, rather than just relying on the CE mark, and the basic requirements to comply with this standard, and Studor has gone the extra mile to obtain KEYMARK approval.

 

The KEYMARK is a European quality mark and product certification scheme issued by Quality Air Admittance Valvesthe European Standard Organisation CEN (similar to the Kitemark issued in the UK by the BSI) and empowered by DIN CERTCO – the certification organisation of DIN, the German Institute for Standardisation. It proves that the Studor products fully comply with EN 12380:2002 through DIN CERTCO’s independent auditing and further reinforces the emphasis Studor places on quality.

In accordance with the KEYMARK regulations, Studor’s factories receive annual unannounced audits by NSF International and our products are tested by BRE, an independent testing institute, every two years.

Quality Air Admittance ValvesDuring the production process, every Studor valve is tested twice. In addition, a percentage from each production batch is randomly selected and submitted from the factories to our head office for additional in-house testing by our dedicated Product Engineer.

Studor products are developed not only to comply with international standards, but in many cases to exceed them. One example of this is in relation to the opening pressure of Studor AAVs. Each valve incorporates a Studor patented diaphragm. The quality of an AAV is determined by the material used for the diaphragm, as they need to be precisely engineered to prevent short-term failure. Very tight tolerances are required. Whilst EN12380 requires an opening pressure between 0 Pa and -150 Pa, the Studor AAVs open at -70 Pa, well within the specified limit.

A further example is in relation to the Maxi-Vent AAV. This is rated AI in accordance Quality Air Admittance Valveswith EN12380, which means that it can be installed below the flood level of the appliance to which it is connected and can be installed in extreme temperatures (from -20°C to +60°C). However, Studor guarantees that the Maxi-Vent will operate correctly, with no loss of function whatsoever, at a temperature of -40°C; ideal for areas such as Scandinavia, where the Maxi-Vent AAV can be installed in non-thermally insulated areas.

In the USA, standards ASSE1050 and ASSE1051 include high and low temperature endurance tests, which includes the valves being subjected to -40°F (-40°C) for eight hours before being returned to a laboratory controlled temperature of 73.4°F ± 3.6°F (23.0°C ± 2.0°C) and then being pressure tested. This is a material test, to ensure that the valves will continue to function if the material is exposed to low air temperatures. The same standards include endurance tests of 500,000 cycles in total, which is an aspect not considered within the European EN12380, as yet.

Quality Air Admittance ValvesBy contrast, the testing carried out to exceed the requirements of EN12380 is a functional test, with the testing being carried out whilst the valves are maintained at -40°C (-40°F), ensuring that the valves will operate correctly when they are installed in locations which may drop to this temperature. To the best of our knowledge, there is no one else in the market that is prepared to offer this extensive operating temperature range.

In addition to external installations, as the Maxi-Vent is often installed in roof spaces and voids where temperature can drop significantly (especially as the building insulation is often below the position of the Maxi-Vent), this adds to the product’s versatility. Even in climates where significant low temperatures are not an issue, the performance of the Maxi-Vent in exceeding this standard further confirms the quality of the product and the durability of the diaphragm. This guarantee is supported by an independent test report from BRE, which verifies that the Studor Maxi-Vent fully functions at -40°C.
For further information please refer to www.studor .net.

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Pathogen ‘Nasties’ and Protecting Your Water Barriers

The drainage system is often given little thought – we all know it’s there, but as long as we think it’s working it’s very much “out of sight, out of mind”.

In a domestic residence the drainage system transports waste from the bathroom, toilet and kitchen to the sewer pipes of the mains drainage or to a septic tank or similar. Water trap seals are used beneath the sinks (for example within a bottle trap) and within the U-bend of the toilet to maintain a water barrier between the drainage system and the living space.

Protecting Your Living Space From Pathogen Nasties
When the drainage is working properly the integrity of the water barrier is maintained all of the time, even when water is running or flushing through. However, when there’s a problem with the drainage (which could be for many reasons), the water barrier (the trap seal) can become depleted and the barrier is lost. This means that “nasties” within the drainage system can freely enter the living space – these range from unwelcome noxious gases through to extremely harmful pathogens.

Pathogen Types
A pathogen is a bacteria or virus which can spread disease, including the very well known ones such as Legionnaires’ disease, SARS and the hospital superbugs C. diff and MRSA.

The loss of a trap seal will commonly be indicated by symptoms such as bad smells and noises (gurgling, whooshing or the intake of air). If any of these are experienced we recommend the cause is looked into and rectified as quickly as possible – in most cases, quite simply the installation of one of the Studor AAVs or our combined trap and AAV will solve the problem.

Amoy Gardens Estate in Hong Kong
The tragic outbreak of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) in the Amoy Gardens estate (Hong Kong) in 2003 provides extreme example highlighting the importance of maintaining water trap seals and preventing nasties from the drainage system entering the living space:

The first person of the outbreak developed SARS symptoms on 14 March 2003. When visiting his brother, who owned an apartment in Block E, at Amoy Gardens that same day he used the toilet whilst he was suffering from diarrhoea. SARS then spread throughout the Amoy Gardens estate at an alarming rate, resulting in 321 infected cases and 42 deaths, with the highest concentration of infections being in Block E.

Research has shown that many SARS patients excrete the virus which causes SARS in their stools. In light of the fact that many residents at Amoy Gardens had been complaining about bad smells for some time, and that many U-traps were found to be completely dry, it is believed that the virus spread through the drainage system and contaminated droplets entered the living space of other apartments, infecting their occupants.

In fact, the World Health Organisation’s Environmental Investigation into the outbreak states that defective water trap seals in the drainage system had been a major contributor to its spread.

As mentioned above, this is an extreme example, but it does illustrate why everything should be done to keep nasties in their place – the drainage system – and well away from the living space!

Further information is also available on this government document which summarises the main findings of the Amoy Gardens Estate Investigation.

 

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Don’t blow your top!

Guest blog by Dr. Michael Gormley
MSc MPhil PhD CEng MCIBSE MIET FHEA

Dr.Gormley is a specialist in water supply and drainage as well as an electrical building services engineer. Read his full biography here.

The tradition of venting building drainage systems through the roof is as old as modern systems have existed. Most modern appliances and techniques date back to Victorian times in Britain, around the middle of the 19th Century, when there was a flurry of research and development activity – partially fuelled by the industrial revolution, but also driven by the desire for safe sanitary conditions in the rapidly expanding towns and cities at the time. This process continues to this day, however this is now on a global scale, with the recent significant milestone that there are now more urban dwellers than rural dwellers in the whole world.

The Victorian obsession with cleanliness led the development of heavy water usage appliances, with toilets using as much as 40 litres per flush – with appropriately strong names such as the ‘Tornado’, the ‘Dreadnought’, ‘Trident’ and the ‘Deluge’. They really did believe in the old adage that ‘cleanliness was next to godliness’ and cleanliness meant lots of water and open roof vents on the drainage stack.

Some pretty cool facts and a history lesson to boot, but what has this got to do with modern venting techniques? Well, essentially the struggles of the early Victorian plumber and sanitary engineer are the same as their modern day counterparts. Providing safe and efficient sanitation solutions is as challenging now as it has ever been, more so in many cases, as water conservation requirements demand that modern systems do the same job with less water and materials.

While 19th Century researchers made great efforts to understand drainage systems and laid down the fundamental physics of air flow and the importance of friction, there were limitations to what they could do as they only had rudimentary systems with which to work. Some great figures emerged and among those writing on the subject was Osborne Reynolds – famous for his work on fluid mechanics (remember all those equations with Reynolds number from your fluid mechanics classes? That’s him). We truly are standing on the shoulders of giants in this field.

‘Every generation brings advances and ours is no exception – we have a few tricks up our sleeve too.’

Modern mathematical and computer based modelling techniques have allowed us to charge ahead with advances at a rate hitherto unthinkable. This step change has seen The P.A.P.A. - Studora return to look at the fundamental physics of what is going on in there, under the sink, behind the toilet and in your loft. To blow my own trumpet here a bit, and to shout on my own team – central to this new ‘industrial revolution’ of sorts has been the work from Heriot-Watt University, initiated by the late John Swaffield – co-inventor of the P.A.P.A.TM – John’s work on numerical modelling embedded in the computer program AIRNET has allowed any system of any size to be modelled and venting arrangements assessed before the contractor has laid the foundation stone. John’s work is continued by myself, together with colleagues, Lynne Jack, David Campbell and David Kelly.

So, again, where are we going with this?

Well, most of the innovations of the past 20 years have come out of this fundamental research – the P.A.P.A.TM and the DYTEQTA-SYTSTEM to name a just a few – to this list I would like to add ‘Sealed drainage systems’. This innovation was first used in the O2 Dome in London when it was being upgraded to an entertainment arena in the mid 2000s. As a direct result of the developer’s request that the system should not penetrate the iconic tent-like roof structure.

So, with a brief which precluded the use of roof penetrations, in a building with high peak usage capacities the challenge was immense. The sewerage infrastructure wasn’t straight forward either as part of the system was below the river level, so pumping stations were required.

The methodology used to ‘seal’ the above ground drainage system would not be possible without active control of pressure transients. Active control is a method of dealing with pressure transients as close to their source as possible. This is the ideal goal – trying to draw air in to a system through a high friction, small diameter pipe, simply means that the transient will have sucked out the nearest water trap seal long before the air has arrived from the top of the building. In the case of positive transients a similar problem exists in that the protection afforded by parallel vent pipes is negligible and wholly determined by the ratio of cross sectional areas of the stack pipe and the vent pipe. So, traditional venting doesn’t always achieve the goals set out on the design table.

Actively controlling pressure surges is a much more effective way to protect water trap seals.

Air Admittance Valves (AAVs) provide the correct quantity of air to mitigate against negative pressure transients – and this quantity varies automatically with the magnitude of the applied negative pressure transient. In the same vein, positive pressure reduction devices, such as the P.A.P.A.TM (Positive Air Pressure Attenuator) provide an alternative route for positive pressure transients, protecting water trap seals by attenuating the pressure wave in terms of its magnitude and it’s wave speed, slowly releasing the air back into the system in a non-destructive way to ready itself for the next positive pressure event. Taken together, AAVs and the P.A.P.A.TM operate to maintain system pressures at acceptable levels, thereby ‘tuning’ the system to desired pressure levels.

But what if the top of the stack is sealed, will the whole system not pressurise?

The simple answer to this question is no.

The building drainage system is a dynamic multi-phase fluid and solid carrying system. Air currents circulate between stacks, into sewers and around loops. As long as air is provided by AAVs to counteract the negative pressure transients and positive surges can be dealt with by the P.A.P.A.TM then the system cannot pressurise.

The design of the O2 Arena drainage system wouldn’t have been possible without the use of numerical modelling with AIRNET. Simulations of every possible event scenario took several months to complete and produced graphical output running into the thousands. The result was a clean bill of health for the active control solution in the sealed building. By simulating extreme events it was possible to predict how the system would cope, what pressures would be expected and what the limitations were.

So, from Victorian toilets to a state of the art arena in 21st Century London we can see that without innovation we cannot achieve the necessary goals of improved sanitation for all, in any global context. The combination of academic and industrial research; new technologies, techniques and design methodologies, combined with renewed confidence in our own ability to move things forward in this generation, means that we can cope with existing problems, and, more importantly, whatever challenges are thrown at us in the future.

November  2013.

Dr. Michael Gormley
MSc MPhil PhD CEng MCIBSE MIET FHEA
Institute for Building and Urban Design
Senior Lecturer in Architectural Engineering
Room 3.40 William Arrol Building, School of the Built Environment
Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS
e: m.gormley@hw.ac.uk  t: + 44 (0) 131 451 8262

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Small Stacks Save Space

Studor SSPS Reduces Stack Size to Increase Living Space

An often missed benefit of using the Studor Single Pipe System (SSPS) is that stack pipes used to vent the drainage system can be either eliminated or reduced in size.

As a result, this creates more space within a building relative to its external dimensions; a significant advantage as land for development continues to remain scarce and/or expensive.

Alternatively, more services can be incorporated into the same space; useful as new technology requires more cabling etc.

The flexibility provided by the SSPS gives architects and engineers developing the drainage ventilation systems of buildings increased flexibility in the layout of the living or working space.

This is because the drainage ventilation can be configured in different formats, and the SSPS can vent drainage branches, so reducing and/or eliminating the need for numerous stack vent pipes.

The SSPS also significantly reduces the amount of pipework required, thereby saving costs.

As an example, forty kilometres of pipework, plus fittings, was saved in the 86-storey Trump Tower building in Panama.

This also makes for a more sustainable option as transport costs and, hence, carbon emissions are also reduced.

A combination of the Studor P.A.P.A. (Positive Air Pressure Attenuator) and Studor AAVs is the ideal sustainable solution for any high or medium rise developments.

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The Airflow Calculator

Website Based Facility Calculating EN10256-2:2000 Requirements.

The Air Flow Calculator - Drainage Venting SystemsDo you use the Studor Airflow Calculator?

This is a simple step-by-step formula that assists with the calculations of airflow and waste water flow when designing a drainage system.

The Airflow Calculator provides a calculation based on European Standard EN 12056 – 2:2000 – Gravity Drainage System inside Buildings. This standard helps to ensure that the system you design will perform correctly for buildings up to ten floors.

By simply entering the system type, which is preferable to your drainage requirement, along with frequency factors and the number of appliances, the Excel spreadsheet based system will provide the relevant calculation in litres per second. In addition to the number of Studor AAVs required, the calculator will also advise the diameter of pipe needed based on their loading capacity.

 

 

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Sleek Roof For Ferrari

Studor Enables Unique Domed Roof at Ferrari World Theme Park

The unique design of the Ferrari World Theme Park roof, sporting a massive Ferrari logo, was only made possible using the Studor Single Pipe System (SSPS), an environmentally-friendly and cost effective sealed drainage solution that avoids the need for unsightly roof penetrations.

Background

The Ferrari Theme Park is located on Yas Island in Abu Dhabi, capital of the United Arab Emirates. Part of a joint project between Italian automotive manufacturer Ferrari and ALDAR Properties PJSC, the 250,000 square metre (more than 2.6 million square feet) park is an oasis of discovery, hospitality and beauty that captures the culture, flavour and spirit of Italy, as well as the legendary automotive history and heritage of Ferrari cars and racing.

The iconic roof of Ferrari World is modelled after the side profile of a Ferrari GT.  The roof has a total surface area of 200,000 square meters (2,152,782 sq ft) with a perimeter of 2,200 metres (7,218 ft). The indoor area of Ferrari World, measuring 86,000 m2 (925,696 sq ft), is located under this 50 m (164 ft) high roof, making it the largest indoor amusement park in the world.

A Ferrari logo adorns the roof of the building and measures 65 m (213 ft) by 48.5 m (159.1 ft) – the largest Ferrari logo ever created. 12,370 tonnes of steel has been used to support the roof whose centre is marked by a 100 m (328 ft) glazed funnel.

Planning & Preparation

Drainage Ventilation Systems. The SSPS represents a complete and innovative drainage system solution. The Studor P.A.P.A. (Positive Air Pressure Attenuator) is an integral part of the SSPS and is installed only in conjunction with Studor air admittance valves and other relevant products.

A total of 110 Studor P.A.P.A.s, 310 Mini-Vents and 55 Maxi-Vents formed the SSPS used in the Ferrari World project. The Studor P.A.P.A.s were installed at the top of stacks to avoid the need for open venting through roof.

The P.A.P.A.s absorb the pressure fluctuations inside the sealed drainage system and protect the trap seals in conjunction with the Studor Mini-Vents and Maxi-Vents.

In addition to providing the design expertise, Studor gave technical support as required and also ensured that the local authority regulations were adhered to by conducting periodical inspections.

Result

The use of the SSPS at Ferrari World avoided roof penetrations that would have significantly detracted from the stunning elegance of the design. Because the SSPS promotes a reduction in usage of raw materials, this solution also helped in significantly reducing the time, material and labour costs of ventilating the drainage system of such a massive project.

The Consultant and Contractor were very satisfied with the simplicity of Studor’s design and the easy installation procedures of the SSPS. Studor’s team was fully involved with the installation of the company’s products throughout, which ensured compliance with Studor guidelines and vouchsafed its lifetime warranty.

The Client, ALDAR Properties, was extremely satisfied with the overall reduction in the time for installation and the cost of materials and labour.

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Bergamo Hospital – Beato Giovanni XXIII

Reference Project.

Maxi-FiltraStudor Maxi-Vent Air Admittance Valves (AAVs) were specified for the state-of-the-art Beato Giovanni XXIII hospital in Bergamo, northern Italy, to avoid the contamination of fresh air entering its air conditioning system.

This mid rise 340 million Euro commercial project covers an area of 320,000m² and consists of seven towers (each of five floors), a central building (three storeys high) and three covered internal streets.

The whole hospital houses 1200 rooms, 226 surgeries and 36 operating theatre, plus an A&E unit.

 

Bergamo Hospital - Beato Giovanni XXIIIThe original building services design resulted in the open-air stacks from the drainage system being located too close to the inlet air pipe of the air conditioning systems.

Cross contamination in such a sensitive area would have been unacceptable and the only solution was to install an AAV based drainage system.

Studor Maxi-Vent AAVs were identified to solve the problem as the valve is designed specifically for stack venting and eliminates the need for a vent pipe through the roof.

125 Maxi-Vents were installed with aluminium covers.

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Problem Solving with the Patented P.A.P.A.

Installing P.A.P.A. Solves Penthouse Problems at London Apartments

AAVs are well known for their problem solving abilities, a reason why every plumber The P.A.P.A. - Studorshould keep one or two Studor Mini-Vents and Maxi-Vents in their van.  However, the P.A.P.A. can also play a part, as well as being perfect for new-build multi-storey applications.

Greenwich Creekside is a superb flagship development of four multi-storey buildings close to the River Thames in South London.  However, Woodford Heating & Energy, who had been commissioned to install the heating and plumbing systems, was surprised to be called back because of sewage smells pervading the penthouse apartment of block A.

They quickly found that, although they had followed the M&E designers’ specification and installed conventional air admittance valves (AAVs) as directed, smells were emanating from the drainage system.  This was a result of the AAVs not being designed to work in isolation in such a high rise building.

Whilst AAV’s will avoid the issue of suction of a trap (negative pressure), they will not prevent back pressure (positive transience).  Therefore the water in the trap can be pushed out and into the sink or similar.

Roger Thomas, contracts director at Woodford Heating & Energy, looked for a solution on The P.A.P.A. - Studorthe internet and found the Studor P.A.P.A: “I had not come across this problem before and was unaware of the Studor P.A.P.A but I immediately realised that it would be the ideal solution”. He further commented: “Since installing four P.A.P.A units, in association with the AAVs, we have had no further incidents of bad smells being reported.

With the P.A.P.A. being patented, it is a great product to promote.  Whether for new build or existing applications, a P.A.P.A. specification means you are assured of a sale and, of course, they are only guaranteed when used with Studor AAVs.

For further details or to assist with a P.A.P.A. application, please do not hesitate to contact our technical team on technical@studor.net.

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A “Brite Start” for Studor in the Philippines

In light of the current worldwide economic climate, it is encouraging to hear of economies which are booming.

Our new distributor of the Philippines, Britewater International Ltd Inc., shares their story with us:

The Romans taught us that to urbanise on a grand scale (mega cities) you need good water supply and good sanitation. When sanitation systems aren’t controlled properly, as with cholera outbreak in London in 1854, it highlights even back then, that infections and transfer of pathogens happen. In more recent times, the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong show that control of our systems is important and modernisation is  paramount. Britewater have in their stable, what they like to describe as “source control” or “gatekeeper” engineered solutions to water coming into developments and safely exiting from them.

Studor - Philippines - BritewaterThose behind the new company were looking for “bright” ideas that would bring 21st century technology to the Philippines, which is giving the region a real thirst for the application of up-to-date technologies. Having worked on a number of overseas and local projects with Filipino consultants and engineers, they had discovered a very real and large pool of young, talented, competent, hard working engineers who were capable of working to US, British and European Standards. What was lacking was the normal product technical support that (in the UK and the USA, for example) is so often taken for granted from the manufacturing community.

Many of the major projects in the Philippines (we are talking about building an entire new city; 14 million people in Metro Manila and still growing!) have LEED, or local green / environmental certification. So the environmental interest / credentials are on a par with any other country applying these principles. The local economy and stable government has meant inward investment is at an all-time high. This is driving the boom in developments and construction programmes for office space and factory space, as well as homes and condos. Companies are relocating to the Philippines to take advantage of a young, educated (most have a good command of the English language), relatively cheap labour force, able to readily communicate with all parts of the world.

John Turner, StudorJohn Turner (Technical Director of Britewater), a long time supporter of Studor technology, has many years of experience in the commercial and consulting, research and design fields. He is now utilising his wealth of knowledge and experience to support his all-Filipino team, which also make up the majority share of the board of directors of Britewater. They all have areas of necessary expertise, matched by their energetic enthusiasm and focus for growing a new company in their home territory (most usually have to work abroad or away from family to gain this kind of financial independence).

Studor - PhilippinesIn light of the benefits offered by the Studor Single Pipe System (SSPS), it was a natural decision to include this within the product offerings.  The SPSS is quickly being accepted as THE engineered solution, bringing both technical and financial benefits to the large build project order book now being experienced in the Philippine construction market place. Interestingly, the term ‘Studor it!’ is now commonly being used in the Philippines as a phrase which describes how to solve a challenging drainage ventilation problem.

Lastly, why “Britewater”?
“Britewater” was born from their ‘bright ideas’ approach and the philosophy of bringing the latest drainage venting technology to the Philippines. They tried to register as Brightwater initially, but were not allowed as there are already companies registered here with that name; so that made the decision!

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