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AAV Solutions

Why an AAV can Eliminate Bad Smells in your Drainage System

Here are a few common problems which occur within a drainage system as a result of not having efficient drainage ventilation in place, the common side effect being bad drainage smells due to high pressure difference in the drainage system. This page can be read in conjunction with our Guide to AAVs.

Dry Traps

You are in a high rise building and you have a problem with negative or positive pressure generated within your soil pipes (stacks), the resulting effects being gurgling (causing induced siphonage), bubbling toilets and possible odours.

Problems with residential drainage can be generated by negative pressure within your drainage branches (causing induced siphonage). You may suffer from toilet, kitchen and shower smells in your home, or you need to find the right drainage solution for your en-suite or extension.

A Few Benefits of Using an AAV

  • They are simple, discreet and easy to install.
  • AAVs are designed to provide the necessary air for the drainage system, eliminating the risk of losing the water trap seal and therefore eliminating drainage smells.
  • AAVs decrease the number of pipes that need to penetrate the roof and walls of a property. An AAV will reduce the number of parts required to ventilate a soil system without any compromise on performance.

How does an AAV Stop Bad Smells?

This is how an AAV works in its simplest form:

The membrane in the AAV will remain closed during periods of inactivity; so when you are not using the drainage system, it will remain sealed as a result of the gravity force applied on the membrane. Then, when the toilet is flushed, for example, the flow of the water causes a negative pressure within the pipework.

As this happens the membrane in the valve will open, allowing fresh air to be sucked in through the valve and down into the system until pressure equalisation is achieved. The equalisation of pressure will bring the valve back into its closed mode, preventing the foul air from escaping and the water seals in the traps (bath, toilet and basin) from depleting.